St. George Marathon Legends
St. George Marathon Top 50 Legends 50 - 41
 
Richard Carling Number #50 Richard Carling, Salt Lake City, Utah, a “33 year club member”, has to be considered the “iron man” of the St. George marathon, as he has competed in all of the St. George marathons except for the 1st one in 1977, so 33 in a row. No other male runner has competed in as many St. George marathons as Richard.

His inclusion on this list has to do with this incredible streak, but also with his performance. Richard has three marathon finish times that are in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. He also has a top ten performance, finishing 10th overall in 1981. He was the 2nd master runner (over age 40) in 1981, finishing an agonizing four seconds behind the top master. His average time for his performances in the top 1,000 was 2.35.30. His fastest time of 2.33.21 in 1981 is #465 all time for the St. George marathon.

A former Utah State Senator, Richard began his marathon running in an effort to improve his health on the advice of his doctor. This advice began a lifestyle change that continues to the present day. Not only does he have a consecutive streak of 33 St. George marathons, he also the same streak of 33 straight years in the famous Boston marathon, and also a 30+ year streak of running the Honolulu marathon. Richard also is proud of his involvement in the effort to have the Utah Highway Patrol troopers run the St. George marathon each year. To date, Richard has run 135 marathons, but considers St. George his favorite. His comments about the race are, “no other marathon that is better organized”, a strong “community spirit” keeps him coming back, and overall, the city and marathon staff are “extremely friendly”.

Because of this performance, Richard Carling is the #50 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Lisa Paxton Number #50 Lisa Paxton, South Jordan, Utah, completed the marathon three times in the 2000’s, and all three times are included in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. Lisa completed a successful high school running career at Bingham High School before attempting the marathon. She made her St. George marathon debut in 2004 at age 20 and finished 20th overall in 3:06:06. She came back and ran in the 2007 marathon and finished 5th overall in a remarkably fast time of 2:45:36, which is the 58th fastest female time in the history of the St. George marathon, which will have its 100,000th finisher in 2011. Lisa’s time in 2007 qualified her for the 2008 Women’s Olympic Marathon Trials, which she ran in Boston. In 2008, Lisa came back to St. George and improved her placing, finishing 4th overall in very difficult weather conditions in a time of 2:53:55. Because of this performance, Lisa Paxton is the #50 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

John Harmon Number #49 John Harmon, Orem, Utah, a "12 year club member", competed in the St. George marathon throughout the 1990's. John has eight marathon finish times that are in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. John also had three top 10 finishes. He finished 7th overall in 1997, 9th in 1993, and 10th in 1996. He was also the 4th overall fastest Masters runner (over age 40) in 2002. His average time for eight times in the top 1000 was 2.31.31. John's fastest time was 2.25.31 in 1994 and is #175 all time for the St. George marathon.

John was a successful high school runner at Orem High School, and then ran with Ed Eyestone and BYU during his college years. As is common with other St. George marathon legends that are from Northern Utah, John was a member of the Sojourners Running club, which introduced him to the St. George marathon. John's memories of the St. George marathon center around running a race that was well organized and was run on a beautiful course. John has not run the marathon since 2005, but has fond memories of running the first few miles in the dark, running past Snow's Canyon, and finally the incredible crowd support as he came into the city. However, for John, the St. George marathon also meant something else that is more important than his running accomplishments. John met his wife in the 1996 marathon, and hopes to return to the race in the near future to run with his family. Because of this performance, John Harmon is the #49 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Paula Morrison Number #49 Paula Morrison, Tucson, Arizona, completed the marathon just two times, and both times are included in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. Paula first ran the St. George marathon during the 1999 race, which included many of the top female runners looking to qualify for the 2000 US Olympic Marathon trials. Paula finished in a Trials qualifying time of 2:48:18.
She came back and ran in 2002 and finished 3rd overall in a remarkable time of 2:44:50, which was only a minute behind the winner of the race. Paula’s time in 2002 is the 45th fastest female time in the history of the St. George marathon, which will have its 100,000th finisher in 2011. Her time in 1999 is the #115 all time fastest. Paula also qualified and competed in the 2004 Olympic Trials in St. Louis and the 2008 Olympic Trials in Boston.
Because of this performance, Paula Morrison is the #49 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Tiffany Larson Number #48 Tiffany Larson, Boise, Idaho, completed the marathon just two times, and both times are in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. In 2002, Tiffany came to Southern Utah to run in her first St. George marathon. She was attracted to St. George because of the opportunity to train in the ideal summer months in Idaho and the flexibility in her schedule being a single mom. Tiffany started running after college and realized that she had the potential to run a 2004 Olympic Trials Qualifying time of 2:48. In 2002, she fell just short in a very fast female race, finishing 14th in a time of 2:49:23. This established a new “personal record” for Tiffany, which would last only one year. This time in 2002 is the 136th fastest marathon in St. George history.

However, one year later, she produced a phenomenal race that cemented her placement on the legend list. In 2003, she was coached by Mike Dilley of The Greater Boise Running Club, and together with Honorable Mention legend runner, Cynthia Mauzerall, did the training it required to become a serious contender. In the 2003 race, Tiffany took aim at the 2:48 qualifying time for the Trials, and went out and ran the 31st fastest time ever by a female runner in 2:43:35. This time would have won 17 of the marathons in St. George history. However, in the 2003 race, this incredible time was only good for 2nd place. Tiffany ran a smart race and passed the 2nd place girl in the final mile but could not catch the overall winner.

Because of her 2003 St. George Marathon time, in April of 2004, Tiffany ran in the US Womens Olympic Marathon Trials in St. Louis, Missouri. Tiffany has fond memories of the St. George marathon, calling it one of the “most organized and friendly marathons”. She commented on how stress-free the pre race activities were, from the buses to the bonfires at the start. The course was “beautiful”, and the people involved in the race were “very friendly”. Also, she quite enjoyed the ice cream offered to the runners after the race. She is planning on returning to St. George to run in 2011.

Because of this performance, Tiffany Larson is the #48 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Van Edgette Number #48 Van Edgette, Alta, Utah, competed throughout the 1980’s, and has an impressive five times in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. Van ran his debut marathon in St. George in 1982, and finished overall in 40th place in 2:40:27. This time and placing was impressive for a debut marathon, however, is even more impressive considering Van decided to sleep in a tent out in the red rocks of Southern Utah the night before the race.

The debut was just a preview of what Van would eventually accomplish in St. George. He eventually ended up with four top ten overall finishes. In his second St. George marathon in 1984, he finished in 9th place overall with a time of 2:29:40. In 1985, his overall placing improved to 7th place with a time of 2:28:01. After a 10th place finish in the 1989 race, Van set a personal record in the marathon in 1990 by finishing 6th overall in a time of 2:27:39. This time in 1990 is the 243rd fastest performance all time for the St. George marathon.

As Van looked back at his experience with the St. George marathon, he appreciated the crowd support, especially the last mile on 300 South, with people on their porches and lining the streets cheering as he came by. This quote from Van about those races and his memories in the 1980’s is worth mentioning, “Oh, to turn that corner from Bluff Street to 300 S. down the home stretch one more time…..”

Because of this performance, Van Edgette is the #48 all time performer in the St. George Marathon

Paul Petersen Number #47 . Paul A. Petersen, Logan, Utah, only completed the St. George marathon two times, but his performance in 2007 cemented his place on this list. After competing competitively at Division III Calvin College from 1997 to 2001, Paul made his debut in the St. George marathon in 2005. Paul ran well and finished in 4th place overall with a time of 2:26:34, which is the 204th fastest performance all time for the St. George marathon. The 2005 race however, was just an introduction to Paul's talent that would be on full display in the 2007 St. George marathon.

Paul's goal in the 2007 race was to run below the A standard (2:19:00) for qualifying in the 2008 US Olympic Men's marathon trials to be held in New York City's famous Central Park one month after the 2007 St. George marathon. Paul feels that to run a successful marathon, it takes four factors, a fast course, cool weather with no wind, competition, and great training. The 2007 race gave him all four of those key items. Paul started conservatively, and hit the half in 1:11:24, however, his second half was run in a remarkable time of 1:06:45, for a total time of 2:18:09. Paul's performance is the 16th fastest time in the history of the St. George marathon. This high ranking time is all the more impressive when considering the St. George marathon will have its 100,000th finisher in 2011. Unfortunately for Paul, that time placed him 2nd in the race that year. His time would have won 24 of the 34 St. George marathons run to date. Paul has remarked on how beautiful the marathon course is, especially -finishing the climb out of Dammeron Valley at mile 12 and then plummeting down Snow's Canyon. Beautiful.

In the Olympic trials of 2008, Paul ran against 150 other qualifiers and finished overall in 53rd place. He also qualified for the 2012 Olympic Trials by running a personal record time of 2:17:35 in the 2011 Boston marathon, finishing 17th overall and the 3rd American overall. Because of this performance, Paul A. Peterson is the #47 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Ellen Gibson Number #47 Ellen Gibson, Park City, Utah, completed the St. George marathon just two times, and both times are in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. Her placing on this legend list is due to her remarkable performance in the 1992 marathon. Ellen ran the 28th fastest time ever by a female runner in 2:43:17. This time would have won 18 of the marathons in St. George history. However, in the 1992 race, that fast time was only good for 2nd place, as she finished about a minute behind the winner.

Another factor for Ellen’s remarkable performance in 1992, is that she was age 41, which resulted in her being named the top Masters runner that year. Her age graded time, which adjusts her time to compare with an open division runner, was 2:33:25, truly an incredible effort. Ellen came back in 1995 at age 44 and finished 12th in 2:50:16, which is the 161st fastest time in the history of the race.

Because of this performance, Ellen Gibson is the #47 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Alydia Barton Number #46 Alydia Barton, Ogden, Utah, is a member of the “Ten Year Club” which by definition is any participant that has completed at least ten marathons in St. George. She competed in the marathon throughout the 1990’s and the 2000’s, and all ten of her performances are in the top 1,000 fastest female times in the history of the race. There are only two women that have competed in the St. George marathon that have more than Alydia’s ten times in the top 1,000. Her average time for her performances in the top 1,000 is 2:56:01.

Alydia ran in college for Weber State University. She continued her running after college, and entered the St. George marathon for the first time in 1993. Her debut in the marathon in St. George ended up with an overall 3rd place finish with a time of 2:55:53. Alydia returned in 1994 with the goal of qualifying for the 1996 Olympic Marathon Trials, and she did just that finishing 6th overall in a fast race running a time of 2:49:46. Alydia had her third top ten finish in 2000, finishing 6th overall in 2:56:42 in a slow year because of the warm weather conditions for the race. In 2007, fourteen years after her debut, Alydia ran her fastest time in St. George at age 38 with a time of 2:49:39, which is the 142nd fastest female time in the history of the race. In 2010, Alydia again finished in the top ten overall with a 9th place finish in a time of 2:58:42, which also earned her 3rd place in the Masters division.

To fully appreciate Alydia’s success in the St. George marathon, you have to consider that throughout the years she was competing at a high level with four top ten finishes, she also gave birth to her six children. She has had great success as a mother and a competitive marathoner and now looks forward to 4 daughters and 2 sons waiting for her at the finish line. Alydia has enjoyed the St. George marathon through the years, and is appreciative that the race organizers are very accommodating and accept feedback from the runners. She also commented on the beauty of the course and how supportive the St. George community is for the marathon.

Because of this performance, Alydia Barton is the #46 all time performer in the St. George Marathon

Mark Holland Number #46 Mark Holland, Midvale, Utah, is a member of the “Ten Year Club” which by definition is any participant that has completed at least ten marathons in St. George. Mark ran the marathon 11 years competing during the 1980’s and 1990’s. Prior to his running accomplishments, Mark enjoyed success in a different sport, as he was an All-American football player at wide receiver, who played for Dixie College and SUSC in the late 1970’s. While in college, Mark was inspired to take up running for physical fitness. His marathon debut in St. George at age 28 was in 1984, when he ran 2:54:29. This debut is very modest compared to what Mark was able to achieve over a 14 year period. The next year, he was able to improve to 2:43:05 and an overall placing of 44th.

In 1986 Mark finished 15th place overall with a time of 2:29:47, which also earned him the #318th slot in the top 1,000 all time fastest St. George marathon finishing times. Mark in total has an impressive seven times in top 1,000. In 1991, Mark ran his personal record in St. George, with a placing of 12th overall and a time of 2:28:49, which is the 285th fastest time in St. George. However, Mark earned his spot as a legend of the St. George Marathon with his performances after he turned age 40. In 1996, in his debut as a runner over age 40, Mark won the Masters title with a time of 2:34:19. Mark won by only 14 seconds over the next Masters runner and less than a minute over the 3rd place Masters runner. He repeated the title as Masters Champion in 1998 with a time of 2:31:34, finishing in 11th place overall. His average time for his seven performances in the top 1,000 was 2.32.11.

Because of this performance, Mark Holland is the #46 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Beverly Buss Number #45 Beverly Buss, Pasadena, California, completed the St. George marathon just three times, and all her performances are in the top 1,000 fastest female times in the history of the race. Her average time for her times in the top 1,000 was 2:49:30. Beverly ran in St. George for the first time in 1995 because of the reputation of the marathon as highly organized and a great place to run an Olympic Marathon Trials qualifying time. She was a member of running clubs based in Pasadena and traveled to the race with other club members that will also eventually be revealed as legends on this list.

The 1995 race was a fast race with ideal weather and many other runners seeking a qualifying time. There were 11 females that broke 2:50 in the race, however, Beverly fell short as she finished 14th overall with a time of 2:52:14. She came back in 1996 with the experience of knowing the course, and improved greatly by finishing 3rd overall with a time of 2:49:01, which is the 130th fastest female time in the history of the race. Bev was excited for the overall placing and personal record in 1996, but still fell short of the Olympic qualifying time.

In 1998, Bev came back and improved on her finish from 1996. For her training and preparation for the race in 1998, she incorporated trail running and also started to cross train with triathletes. Bev also was an assistant coach for Poly Tech High School in Pasadena, and her cross country athletes all were aware of her goals for the race. As the 1998 race reached the halfway point, Bev was behind pace and considered not finishing the race. However, because of her stubbornness and her desire to show the high school runners to never give up, she dug down deep to run strong in the second half of the race. This extra effort paid off, as she ran the 96th fastest time in the history of the race, running 2:47:14, and also finished 2nd overall. This time during the 1998 race allowed Bev to participate in the 2000 Olympic Marathon Trials held in Columbia, South Carolina in February 2000. Bev has positive memories about the St. George marathon and also the city of St. George. She was impressed with the community support and the marathon staff and noted how festive the city was during the race.

Because of this performance, Beverly Buss is the #45 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

John Cahill Number #45 John Cahill, Salt Lake City, Utah, is a member of the “Ten Year Club” which by definition is any participant that has completed at least ten marathons in St. George. John ran the marathon 12 years competing in various years from 1989 to 2005. John, known by many runners for his ponytail hair style, is considered a legend for very fast age graded times, as he performed at a very high level at over age 65! An age graded time adjusts a marathon time for a runner over age 40 to compare with what an open division runner would run with the same effort.

After only one year of running, inspired by angioplasty to clear a clogged coronary artery, John ran his debut marathon in St. George in 1989 at age 65. John won his age division with a time of 3:04:49, which can be age graded (AG) to a time of 2:23:18. In 1993, at age 69, he ran 3:05:17 and AG time of 2:17:44, again winning his division. His fastest age graded time, however, came in 1996 at age 72, when John ran a phenomenal time of 3:05:50, which resulted in the 2nd fastest age graded time in the history of the race, 2:13:31. This time in 1996 still stands as the fastest time in the age group 70-74 for the St. George marathon and was also a United States national marathon record for this age group. In 2001, at age 77, John also set a still standing St. George marathon record in the age group 75-79 by running a time of 3.30.44. John eventually ran four marathons that had an age graded time under 2:20:00.

Because of this performance, John Cahill is the #45 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Golden Harper Number #44 Golden Harper, Orem, Utah, deserves to be included on the all time St. George Marathon Legend list for competing at a very high level at such a young age. For the five year period when Golden was age 10 to age 14, he ran marathon times that have to be considered remarkable. Prior to Golden making his marathon debut in 1992, the age group record for 12 and Under was 3:15:34 and had been unchallenged for 11 years. Golden was age 10 in 1992 and lowered the age group record to 3:08:04, winning his age group by 26 minutes and beating 90% of all the finishers that year. In 1993, Golden returned intent on lowering his age group record and also set his sights on breaking the 3 hour barrier. He was able to accomplish both, finishing in the top 6% of all finishers with a time of 2:57:27. This would set the stage for his remarkable effort in 1994.

In 1994, Golden was 12 years old and surpassed the lofty results of the previous two years. He ran the 26.2 miles of the St. George marathon faster than anyone under 12 had ever run a marathon, setting a World Record at the time. He ran 2:45:35 which is still the age group record in St. George for 12 and Under. This time on an age graded basis is 2:20:45. He finished 83rd in the entire race which had over 3,000 finishers, and won his age group by an astounding 39 minutes.

In 1995, Golden set his goal to beat the then record for age group 13-14. Golden ran his fastest St. George Marathon at age 13 of 2:44:53, beating the old age group record by 11 minutes, and it still stands today as the age group 13-14 record. Finally, in 1996, Golden ran in St. George for the last time, and achieved his highest overall placing, finishing 40th overall and in the top 1% of all runners. For the five year period 1992 to 1996, Golden won his age group by an average of 31 minutes and he is one of only five runners for the St. George marathon that hold more than one overall age group record.
Because of this performance, Golden Harper is the #44 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Kirsten Whetstone Number #44 Kirsten Whetstone, Park City, Utah, completed the marathon just three times, and all three performances are in the top 1,000 fastest marathon times in the history of the St. George marathon. Her average time for her performances is 2:49:15. Kirsten first ran the St. George marathon in 1984. She had been training in Logan, Utah in the fall of 1983 focusing on qualifying for the first US Olympic Marathon Trials to be held in May 1984 in Olympia, Washington. She had run two marathons early in 1984 and missed qualifying in both races. She then decided to run St. George, as she had learned of the reputation of the marathon being well organized and fast. During the 1984 race, Kirsten found herself in first place for a majority of the race, however, ended up in 4th place in a time of 2:52:59, as she underestimated the downhill section of the course and the effect it had on her legs. Even though she finished in 4th, the time was a personal record for her, and is still the 216th fastest time ran in St. George.

Kirsten came back to St. George for the 1987 race, which included many fast females all looking to qualify with a time under 2:50:00 for the 1988 Olympic Marathon Trials to be held in May 1988 in Pittsburgh. Kirsten focused her pacing on this goal, finishing 7th overall and beating the time standard by seven seconds in 2:49:53.

In 1990, Kirsten returned, again focused on qualifying again for the Olympic Trials in January 1992 in Houston. Kirsten’s 1990 marathon still stands as her “perfect race”. It was her fastest time ever, but also the easiest marathon she has run, as she felt great both physically and mentally throughout the race. She ran with the lead pack for the first two miles, but then backed off and focused on her attempt to qualify. When the race was over, Kirsten had run a time of 2:44:54, the 47th fastest time in the history of the St. George marathon. She finished in 3rd place overall, only two minutes behind the winner.

Kirsten is in a very select group of female marathoners, in that she finished two Olympic Marathon trials, both in 1988 and 1992. Her comment about the St. George marathon is that “every runner should have this race on a must do list”, and that it is “an amazing and beautiful course” that is “well organized and has outstanding community support”. Because of this performance, Kirsten Whetstone is the #44 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Paul Nance Number #43 Paul Nance, Washington, Utah, is a unique member of the “Ten Year Club” which by definition is any participant that has completed at least ten marathons in St. George. What makes Paul so unique is that he has completed 32 of the 34 marathons. Only two people in the history of the race have run more than Paul’s 32 years. In addition to this streak of longevity, Paul has been consistent in his results, which have been very fast. It is remarkable to note that in every one of Paul’s 32 years of the marathon, he finished in the top 3 of his age group every year, including 12 years of finishing 1st. Paul’s began running marathons later in life as he didn’t run his first St. George marathon until he was age 50. He took up running for health reasons, as it was a great way to help him stay in shape and also as a way to reduce his stress level. His goal in his first St. George marathon was to break 3 hours, which he did with ease running 2:54:46.

Paul’s fastest time was 2:44:36 which he ran in 1985 at age 55 which can be age graded (AG) to a time of 2:20:50. That time placed him in the top 10 in the Masters competition, and also won him the age group by an astounding 11 minutes. It is still the 3rd fastest time ever in the history of the St. George marathon in the age group 55-59. In 1991, at age 61, Paul broke the 3 hour barrier again, winning his age group with a time of 2:57:56, which also is an AG time of 2:23:41. He eventually had three AG times under 2:25.

Paul’s toughest year running the marathon was in 2010, as he suffered a foot injury during the race, but still finished 3rd place in the 80-84 age group. He is planning on running again in 2011, and it is safe to say he will finish in the top 3 again. Paul has chosen to run St. George each year because the marathon is convenient for him and also a pleasant experience each year. He has run over 100 marathons including New York City, Boston, and Los Angeles, but says that St. George is his favorite due to the beautiful course, the crowd support and the organized effort of the race.
Because of this performance, Paul Nance is the #43 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Bette Poppers Number #43 Bette Poppers, Littleton, Colorado only completed the St. George marathon in 1986, however, her performance earned her the title of Legend. Bette has been recognized as one of the first female long distance athletes in the United States. She had a late start in her running career, beginning in 1975 in her mid 30’s. However, her talent quickly surfaced as she won the 1979 United Bank of Denver marathon.

In 1984, Bette qualified for the first United States Olympic Marathon Trials that were held in May 1984 in Olympia, Washington. She was one of only seven Masters (over age 40) runners that participated in that first marathon trials. She decided to run the St. George marathon in 1986 looking to qualify for the 1988 Marathon Trials. She chose St. George based on the reputation of a fast downhill course, and the positive comments from other runners on the organization of the race. During the 1986 race, she took the lead from the start, and held that lead until the late stages of the race, where she was passed by the eventual champion. She held on to 2nd place and won the Masters title in a remarkable time of 2:44:48, which is the 44th fastest time that has ever been run in the St. George marathon. Bette’s time was the fastest ever run up to that point by a Masters runner, and was a personal record in her career. On an age graded basis, her time in 1986 would be 2:31:20.

Bette still considers her performance in 1986 as one of her highlights of her career. Other highlights would have to include participating in both of the first two Olympic Marathon Trials in 1984 and 1988. In addition to being named a legend of the St. George marathon, Bette also has been inducted in both the Colorado Sportswomen’s Hall of Fame and the Colorado Running Hall of Fame.
Because of this performance, Betty Poppers is the #43 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

J. Garn Mcbride Number #42 J. Garn McBride, Salt Lake City, Utah, a “21 year club member”, has made the legend list for his consistent marathon running at a high competitive level. Garn came to St. George to run the marathon for the first time in 1990 at age 58. It was only his second marathon, with his first run just a few months before at the Deseret News Marathon in Salt Lake City. He had not run competitively since competing in the one mile and two mile events on the track team at the University of South Carolina in the early 1950’s. His St. George marathon time in 1990 was fast enough to qualify him for the Boston Marathon, however this was just an introduction to his talent that he would put on display for the next 20 years in St. George. In 1993, at age 61, Garn finished 1st overall in his age category for the first time by running 2:55:20 in the 60-64 age group, which can be age graded (AG) to a time of 2:21:35. In 1995, Garn ran his fastest St. George marathon at age 63 in a time of 2:52:20, which is AG time of 2:16:24. In 1997, he set an age group record in age 65-69 running a phenomenal time of 2:55:21, which age grades to one of the fastest times in the history of the race, 2:15:58.

Garn would break the 3 hour barrier one more time in 2000 at age 68 with a time of 2:59:30 or AG 2:17:45. Garn is the only male runner in the history of the St. George marathon to hold three age group records. In addition to the age group 65-69 record noted above, he also holds the 70-74 new course record in a time of 3:37:09 set in 2006. The 75-79 age group new course record is also credited to Garn, as he ran 3:43:22 in 2007.

Garn began his marathon career based on a friendly bet for a milkshake with a co-worker in 1990, and that bet has resulted in a 21 year streak of remarkable running. The last 16 years that Garn has run the marathon, he finished either a remarkable 1st or 2nd in his age group. He attributes his success to his competitive nature of always striving to do his best.

Garn has fond memories of St. George and used the race in combination with vacation time to spend with his family. He has always enjoyed the festive nature of the race, and looks forward each year to the pasta dinner the night before the race. Because of this performance, J. Garn McBride is the #42 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Lisbet Sunshine Number #42 Lisbet Sunshine, San Francisco, California, only completed the St. George marathon in 2006, however, her performance earned her the title of Legend. Fourteen years previous to her St. George marathon appearance, Lisbet was able to accomplish what only a few select runners have achieved, and that was to qualify and also run in the 1992 United States Olympic Marathon Trials in Houston. However, that only tells a small part of the story. The rest of the story is that Lisbet also ran in the 1996 and the 2000 Olympic trials. In total, leading up to the 2006 St. George marathon, she had qualified for four Olympic marathon trials and had run in three of them.

In 2006, Lisbet came to St. George to try and qualify for the 2008 Olympic trials to be held in Boston, which would be a fifth time qualifying, an accomplishment that only a few women have done. She chose St. George because she had heard from other runners what a well organized race and what a great reputation it had to achieve a qualifying time for the Trials. She had visited St. George once before, and became entranced by the beautiful red rocks that surround the city.

As she lined up at the start line in 2006, Lisbet was not confident at all in having a good race, as her training during the summer had been inconsistent. She settled into 2nd place during the first half of the race, but a bathroom stop had allowed other top women runners to pass her. During the stop, Lisbet figured her chances of qualifying for the Trials was not good, but she made up time on the 2nd half downhill portion. She also proceeded to pass the women that had gone ahead of her during her stop. By mile 24, she was back into 2nd place overall, and realized she was back on pace for a qualifying time. She did finish 2nd overall in a time of 2:44:16, which was a career personal record, and more importantly for Lisbet, allowed her to run in the Olympic Trials in 2008.

As Lisbet was age 42 when she ran in 2006, she was acknowledged as the Masters Champion. Her time was the 38th fastest time in the history of the race, which will have its 100,000 finisher in 2011. On an age graded basis, her time would be 2:33:23. Only two other Masters women have run a faster time than Lisbet’s 2:44:16 in the entire history of the St. George marathon. Because of this performance, Lisbet Sunshine is the #42 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Gaylon Jorgensen Number #41 Gaylon Jorgensen, Provo, Utah, ran two remarkable performances in the St. George marathon during the 1980’s. Gaylon did not even start running at all until he was 47 years old and in his first marathon attempt, the Deseret News Marathon in Salt Lake City, he ran 3:15, which would end up as the only time in his 32 marathons that his time was over 3 hours.

Gaylon came to St. George for the first time in 1981 and at age 52, Gaylon proceeded to run an incredible time of 2.36.27, which was a course record in the age group 50-54, and would stand for nine years. His time in 1981 can be age graded (AG) to a time of 2:17:38. This performance was very good, but not as amazing as his jaw dropping performance the next time Gaylon came back to St. George.

Gaylon was a pilot with United Airlines for 32 years, and one benefit of working for the airlines was his ability to fly all over the world. This resulted in Gaylon running over 30 marathons in cities such as New York, Chicago, Honolulu, Boston and Minneapolis. He enjoyed success in the race in Minnesota, the Twin Cities Marathon, including his lifetime personal record of 2:35:44, but unfortunately it is held the same weekend as St. George. This resulted in Gaylon only running the marathon in St. George just one more year, in 1988.

His race in 1988 has to be a strong candidate for the greatest one year race in St. George’s history. Gaylon was 59 years old in 1988 but was in top condition and ready to go. He clearly remembers going too fast in the first mile, and dialing back his energy level so that he would run a great race and not burn out early. He proceeded to run 2:37:59, which can be age graded to the fastest time ever in the history of the St. George marathon. His time on an AG basis would be 2:10:07. His time in 1988 broke the previous age group record by 13 minutes, and no runner in this age group since then has been within 4 minutes of his time. His effort in 1988 is the only entry in the top 1,000 fastest times in the history of the race to be from the age group 55-59.

Because of this incredible performance over age 50, Gaylon Jorgensen is the #41 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.

Barbara Miller Number #41 Barbara Miller, Modesto, California, only completed the St. George marathon one time, in 1998, but her performance qualified her as a Legend of the race.

Barbara did not start running at all until age 43, however, her talent quickly surfaced to an elite level, and she has accumulated many records on her impressive resume in road racing.

She decided to run the St. George marathon at age 59 in 1998 based on the reputation she had heard of it being a fun and well organized race. She loved the experience, and was very impressed with the bonfires at the start. When the gun went off, Barbara realized very quickly that this was going to be one of those races that she felt like she had “wings” on. She ran a smart race by floating through the early uphill miles and then pounding the downhill portion to run her career race. Her time of 3:01:18 in 1998 is a career personal record. She ended up as the second Masters runner, which at age 59, is the oldest runner to finish in the top 2 in the Masters category.

Her 1998 marathon time on an age graded basis is the second fastest in the history of the race, a time of 2:14:52. She is one of only 3 women in the age group 55-59 that have a race that is fast enough to be included in the top 1,000 fastest times in the St. George marathon. She also holds the old St. George marathon course record for age group 55-59.

Barbara’s performance in 1998 qualified her for elite status in the 1999 Boston Marathon, where she ran a World Record in the marathon for age group 60-64, with a time of 3:11:57. Currently, Barbara still holds one American road racing record in age group 55-59, three American road racing records in age group 60-64, and five American road racing records in age group 65-69. Because of this performance, Barbara Miller is the #41 all time performer in the St. George Marathon.